Home Linux How To Visualize Disk Space Usage With Vizex In Linux

How To Visualize Disk Space Usage With Vizex In Linux

By sk
1584 Views

There are multitude of applications available to view as well as visualize disk usage in Linux. We already have looked at du, Ncdu, Agedu, Filelight, Duc and a few good alternatives to du command. Today we will discuss about yet another tool named Vizex to visualize disk space usage in Linux.

What is Vizex?

Vizex is a command line program to display disk usage for all partitions and media in a nice graphical layout. The output of Vizex shows the total size, total used space, free space and percentage of used space of each partition in a horizontal bar chart-like diagrams.

We can customize the output as per our liking using various options. For example, we can display the visualized disk usage of a specific path. We can exclude specific partition details from the output. We can save the partitions full information in a csv or json file. It is even possible to display the battery information of a Laptop using Vizex.

Additionally, Vizex has a feature to print the directory contents with size, file types, and last modified date.

Vizex is written in Python language and its source code is freely available in GitHub.

Install Vizex in Linux

Vizex requires Python >= 3.7 and the Pip package manager. Make sure you have installed them on your Linux machine. If Pip is not installed yet, refer the following guide:

After installing pip, run the following command to install Vizex on your Linux system:

$ pip install vizex

To upgrade Vizex, run:

$ pip install vizex --upgrade

Vizex is available in AUR, so the Arch Linux users can install Vizex using any AUR helper programs like Yay.

$ yay -S vizex

Visualize Disk Space Usage With Vizex In Linux

Run Vizex without any options to display disk space usage in graphical format:

$ vizex

Sample output:

root
Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used


Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used

usr
Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used

var
Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used

boot
Total: 975.9 mb	 Used: 95.1 mb	 Free: 813.6 mb
███▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 10.5% used

home
Total: 218.8 gb	 Used: 113.2 gb	 Free: 94.5 gb
███████████████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 54.5% used

3968763a-adde-46e0-ae93-e2a1e51120da
Total: 457.4 gb	 Used: 387.9 gb	 Free: 46.2 gb
████████████████████████████████▒░░░░░░ 89.3% used
Visualize disk space usage with vizex
Visualize disk space usage with vizex

As you can in the above output, the disk space usage is neatly displayed in a bar chart-like graphical diagram. Each graph shows the details individual partition details such as total size, remaining space, free space and the percentage of used space.

If you want additional details like filesystem type and mount point of each partition, use --details option:

$ vizex --details

Sample output:

root
Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/


Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/

usr
Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/usr

var
Total: 68.4 gb	 Used: 17.2 gb	 Free: 47.7 gb
█████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 26.5% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/var

boot
Total: 975.9 mb	 Used: 95.1 mb	 Free: 813.6 mb
███▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 10.5% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/boot

home
Total: 218.8 gb	 Used: 113.9 gb	 Free: 93.7 gb
███████████████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 54.9% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/var/home

3968763a-adde-46e0-ae93-e2a1e51120da
Total: 457.4 gb	 Used: 387.9 gb	 Free: 46.2 gb
████████████████████████████████▒░░░░░░ 89.3% used
fstype=ext4	mountpoint=/run/media/sk/3968763a-adde-46e0-ae93-e2a1e51120da
Visualize disk usage in Linux using vizex
Visualize disk usage in Linux using vizex

Visualize specific path

By default, Vizex displays the disk usage details of all partitions. You can also display disk usage stats of a specific path:

$ vizex --path /var/home/sk/

Sample output:

/var/home/sk/
Total: 218.8 gb	 Used: 113.9 gb	 Free: 93.7 gb
███████████████████▒░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ 54.9% used

Save disk usage details in a file

Vizex has an option to save the disk usage details in either csv or json file.

$ vizex --save "~/ostechnix/disk_info.json"

Customize vizex output

As stated already, we can customize the output of Vizex as per our wish. For instance, you can change the text color with -t, --text flag, header color with -d, --header flag, and graph color with -g, --graph flag:

$ vizex -d white -t red -g blue

Display battery usage

Even though the main goal of Vizex is to display the disk usage, the author has added an additional feature to display the battery usage. It will not display any technical details about the battery. It just displays the battery usage details.

$ vizex battery

Sample output:


Battery
██████████████████████████████████████▒ 100.0%
Plugged in: False	Discharging: 2:48:10	

Display directory and file information using vizexdf

Vizex has a sub command named vizexdf that displays directories and files information in a tabular form.

We can

To print current directory data using vizexdf, run:

$ vizexdf -ads name

The above command will list the contents of current directory along with the size of each directory and file, file types and last modification time.

Here, -a flag is used to display all files including hidden files, -d flag is used to list the contents in descending order, and -s flag is used to sort contents based on name, file type, size, or date. The above command print current directory data including hidden files and folders, sorted by name and in descending order.

Similarly, we can print current directory data sorted by size using this command:

$ vizexdf -ads size

Print current directory data sorted by last modified time:

$ vizexdf -ads dt

In all of the above examples, we displayed the contents of current directory. If you want to display the details of a specific directory, for example ~/Downloads, just mention its path:

$ vizexdf ~/Downloads

For more details, refer he help section of vizex and vizexdf commands:

$ man vizex
$ man vizexdf

Resource:

You May Also Like

Leave a Comment

* By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More