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How To Find Filesystem Types In Linux

Different Ways To Check Linux Filesystem Types

By sk
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Linux supports numerous filesystems, such as Btrfs, ext4, ext3, ext2, exFAT, sysfs, securityfs, FAT16, FAT32, NTFS, and many. The most commonly used filesystems are Ext4 and Btrfs. Have you ever wondered which filesystem you are currently using in your Linux system? No? No problem! This guide lists all possible ways to find the mounted filesystem type in Linux and Unix-like operating systems.

Different Ways To Find Filesystem Types In Linux

There can be many ways to find the filesystem type in Linux. Here, I have given 8 different methods to check Linux filesystem type with examples.

Method 1 - Find Filesystem Type In Linux Using Findmnt

The most commonly used command to determine the type of the underlying filesystem in Linux is Findmnt.

The findmnt command will list all mounted filesystems or search for a filesystem. The findmnt command can be able to search in /etc/fstab, /etc/mtab or /proc/self/mountinfo.

The Findmnt command is the part of the util-linux package, which comes pre-installed in most Linux distributions. Just in case if findmnt command is not available in your system, simply install util-linux package as shown below

To install util-linux package in Debian-based systems using command:

$ sudo apt install util-linux

Let us go ahead and see how to use findmnt command to find the mounted filesystems types in Linux.

When you run findmnt command without any options, it will list all mounted filesystems in a tree-like format:

$ findmnt

Sample output:

TARGET                        SOURCE         FSTYPE          OPTIONS
/                             /dev/nvme0n1p2 ext4            rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro
├─/sys                        sysfs          sysfs           rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/kernel/security      securityfs     securityfs      rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/fs/cgroup            cgroup2        cgroup2         rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/fs/pstore            pstore         pstore          rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/firmware/efi/efivars efivarfs       efivarfs        rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/fs/bpf               bpf            bpf             rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,mode=700
│ ├─/sys/kernel/debug         debugfs        debugfs         rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/kernel/tracing       tracefs        tracefs         rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ ├─/sys/fs/fuse/connections  fusectl        fusectl         rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ └─/sys/kernel/config        configfs       configfs        rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
├─/proc                       proc           proc            rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ └─/proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc  systemd-1      autofs          rw,relatime,fd=29,pgrp=1,timeout=0,minproto=5,maxproto=5,direct,pipe_ino=20897
├─/dev                        udev           devtmpfs        rw,nosuid,relatime,size=16196312k,nr_inodes=4049078,mode=755,inode64
│ ├─/dev/pts                  devpts         devpts          rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,gid=5,mode=620,ptmxmode=000
│ ├─/dev/shm                  tmpfs          tmpfs           rw,nosuid,nodev,inode64
│ ├─/dev/mqueue               mqueue         mqueue          rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime
│ └─/dev/hugepages            hugetlbfs      hugetlbfs       rw,relatime,pagesize=2M
├─/run                        tmpfs          tmpfs           rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=3249276k,mode=755,inode64
│ ├─/run/lock                 tmpfs          tmpfs           rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=5120k,inode64
│ ├─/run/rpc_pipefs           sunrpc         rpc_pipefs      rw,relatime
│ └─/run/user/1000            tmpfs          tmpfs           rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,size=3249272k,nr_inodes=812318,mode=700,uid=1000,gid=1000,inode64
│   ├─/run/user/1000/gvfs     gvfsd-fuse     fuse.gvfsd-fuse rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=1000
│   └─/run/user/1000/doc      portal         fuse.portal     rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=1000
├─/boot/efi                   /dev/nvme0n1p1 vfat            rw,relatime,fmask=0077,dmask=0077,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,errors=remount-ro
├─/media/ostechnix/SK_WD_SSD  /dev/sda1      exfat           rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,noatime,nodiratime,fmask=0000,dmask=0000,allow_utime=0022,iocharset=utf8,errors=remount-ro
├─/var/lib/lxcfs              lxcfs          fuse.lxcfs      rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,allow_other
└─/etc/pve                    /dev/fuse      fuse            rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,default_permissions,allow_other
Find Filesystem Type In Linux Using Findmnt
Find Filesystem Type In Linux Using Findmnt

As you can see in the above output, the findmnt command displays the target mount point (TARGET), source device (SOURCE), file system type (FSTYPE), and relevant mount options, like whether the filesystem is read/write or read-only. (OPTIONS). In my case, my root(/) filesystem type is EXT4.

If you don't want to display the output in tree-like format, you can use -l flag to display filesystem types in simple, plain list format.

$ findmnt -l
Display Filesystem Types In List Format With Findmnt Command
Display Filesystem Types In List Format With Findmnt Command

You can also list the partitions of a particular filesystem only, for example ext4, using -t option.

$ findmnt -t ext4
TARGET SOURCE FSTYPE OPTIONS
/ /dev/sda2 ext4 rw,relatime,commit=360
└─/boot /dev/sda1 ext4 rw,relatime,commit=360,data=ordered

Findmnt can also produce df style output as well.

$ findmnt --df

Or,

$ findmnt -D

Sample output:

Findmnt Output In Df Style Format
Findmnt Output In Df Style Format

This is equivalent to df -T command.

You can also display the underlying filesystem of a specific partition, or mountpoint as well.

Search for a device:

$ findmnt /dev/nvme0n1p2
TARGET                SOURCE         FSTYPE OPTIONS
/                     /dev/nvme0n1p2 ext4   rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro
/run/timeshift/backup /dev/nvme0n1p2 ext4   rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro

Search for a mountpoint:

$ findmnt /
TARGET SOURCE         FSTYPE OPTIONS
/      /dev/nvme0n1p2 ext4   rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro

You can even find filesystems with specific label:

$ findmnt LABEL=Storage

For more details, refer the findmnt command man pages.

$ man findmnt

The findmnt command is just enough to find the type of a mounted filesystem in Linux. It is created for that specific purpose only. However, there are also a few other ways available to view filesystem types in Linux. If you're interested to know, read on.

Method 2 - Check Filesystem Type In Linux Using blkid command

The blkid command is used locate and print block device attributes. It is also part of the util-linux package, so you don't bother to install it.

To list all block devices along with the filesystem type, simply run it without any parameters:

$ sudo blkid

Sample output:

/dev/nvme0n1p1: UUID="CF87-3143" BLOCK_SIZE="512" TYPE="vfat" PARTUUID="9dc59fb7-f900-484d-b4c5-c9090b901727"
/dev/nvme0n1p2: UUID="99406049-9ff5-47d1-a1ce-d5e27cd859c0" BLOCK_SIZE="4096" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="f2d515b2-a3c4-4c8c-a609-91d5b755b001"
/dev/nvme0n1p3: UUID="1ff239fc-674c-4749-9c73-fe5d0668071a" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="95db6d7b-903b-4f8c-8583-bd00070aa45a"
/dev/sda1: LABEL="SK_WD_SSD" UUID="2A81-C276" BLOCK_SIZE="512" TYPE="exfat" PTTYPE="dos" PARTUUID="6251cb36-01"
/dev/sda2: SEC_TYPE="msdos" LABEL_FATBOOT="VTOYEFI" LABEL="VTOYEFI" UUID="5A89-BA75" BLOCK_SIZE="512" TYPE="vfat" PARTUUID="6251cb36-02"

To find out the type of a filesystem of specific device, for example /dev/sda1, run:

$ sudo blkid /dev/sda1
/dev/sda1: LABEL="SK_WD_SSD" UUID="2A81-C276" BLOCK_SIZE="512" TYPE="exfat" PTTYPE="dos" PARTUUID="6251cb36-01"

You can also display more detailed information using command:

$ sudo blkid -po udev /dev/sda1
ID_FS_LABEL=SK_WD_SSD
ID_FS_LABEL_ENC=SK_WD_SSD
ID_FS_UUID=2A81-C276
ID_FS_UUID_ENC=2A81-C276
ID_FS_VERSION=1.0
ID_FS_BLOCK_SIZE=512
ID_FS_TYPE=exfat
ID_FS_USAGE=filesystem
ID_PART_TABLE_TYPE=dos
ID_PART_ENTRY_SCHEME=dos
ID_PART_ENTRY_UUID=6251cb36-01
ID_PART_ENTRY_TYPE=0x7
ID_PART_ENTRY_FLAGS=0x80
ID_PART_ENTRY_NUMBER=1
ID_PART_ENTRY_OFFSET=2048
ID_PART_ENTRY_SIZE=1953457584
ID_PART_ENTRY_DISK=8:0

For more details, refer blkid command's man pages.

$ man blkid

Method 3 - Determine Linux Filesystem Type Using df command

The df command is used to report filesystem disk space usage in Linux and Unix-like operating systems.

To find the type of all mounted filesystems, simply run:

$ sudo df -T

Sample output:

Determine Linux Filesystem Type Using Df Command
Determine Linux Filesystem Type Using Df Command

Remember we can get the same result with findmnt -df or findmnt -D command.

For details about df command, refer the following guide.

Also, check df command man pages.

$ man df

Method 4 - View Linux Filesystem Type Using File Command

The file command determines the type of a specified file. It works just fine for files with no file extension.

Run the following command to find the filesystem type of a partition:

$ sudo file -sL /dev/nvme0n1p2
/dev/nvme0n1p2: Linux rev 1.0 ext4 filesystem data, UUID=99406049-9ff5-47d1-a1ce-d5e27cd859c0 (needs journal recovery) (extents) (64bit) (large files) (huge files)

Check man pages for more details:

$ man file

Method 5 - Display Filesystem Type In Linux Using Fsck Command

The fsck command is used to check the integrity of a filesystem or repair it.

You can find the type of a filesystem with fsck command by passing the partition as an argument like below.

$ sudo fsck -N /dev/nvme0n1p2
fsck from util-linux 2.36.1
[/usr/sbin/fsck.ext4 (1) -- /] fsck.ext4 /dev/nvme0n1p2 

For more details, refer fsck command man pages.

$ man fsck

Method 6 - Find Mounted Filesystem Type Using Fstab File

Fstab is a file that contains static information about the filesystems. This file usually contains the mount point, filesystem type and mount options.

To view the type of a filesystem, simply run:

$ cat /etc/fstab

Sample output:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# systemd generates mount units based on this file, see systemd.mount(5).
# Please run 'systemctl daemon-reload' after making changes here.
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
# / was on /dev/nvme0n1p2 during installation
UUID=99406049-9ff5-47d1-a1ce-d5e27cd859c0 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# /boot/efi was on /dev/nvme0n1p1 during installation
UUID=CF87-3143  /boot/efi       vfat    umask=0077      0       1
# swap was on /dev/nvme0n1p3 during installation
UUID=1ff239fc-674c-4749-9c73-fe5d0668071a none            swap    sw              0       0
LABEL=SK_WD_SSD /media/ostechnix/SK_WD_SSD      exfat    errors=remount-ro,defaults,users,noatime,nodiratime,umask=0	0       2

For more details about Fstab file, refer the following guide.

Also refer fsck command man pages.

$ man fstab

Method 7 - Get Filesystem Type In Linux Using lsblk command

The lsblk command displays the information about devices.

To display information about mounted filesystems, simply run:

$ lsblk -f
NAME        FSTYPE FSVER LABEL     UUID                                 FSAVAIL FSUSE% MOUNTPOINT
sda                                                                                    
├─sda1      exfat  1.0   SK_WD_SSD 2A81-C276                             747.5G    20% /media/ostechnix/SK_WD_SSD
└─sda2      vfat   FAT16 VTOYEFI   5A89-BA75                                           
nvme0n1                                                                                
├─nvme0n1p1 vfat   FAT32           CF87-3143                             507.6M     1% /boot/efi
├─nvme0n1p2 ext4   1.0             99406049-9ff5-47d1-a1ce-d5e27cd859c0  214.4G    48% /run/timeshift/backup
└─nvme0n1p3 swap   1               1ff239fc-674c-4749-9c73-fe5d0668071a                [SWAP]

For more usage details, refer lsblk command man pages.

$ man lsblk

Method 8 - Find Mounted Filesystem Type Using mount command

The mount command is used to mount a local or remote filesystems in Unix-like systems.

To find out the type of a filesystem using mount command, do:

$ mount | grep "^/dev"
/dev/nvme0n1p2 on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro)
/dev/nvme0n1p1 on /boot/efi type vfat (rw,relatime,fmask=0077,dmask=0077,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,errors=remount-ro)
/dev/sda1 on /media/ostechnix/SK_WD_SSD type exfat (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,noatime,nodiratime,fmask=0000,dmask=0000,allow_utime=0022,iocharset=utf8,errors=remount-ro)
/dev/fuse on /etc/pve type fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,default_permissions,allow_other)
/dev/nvme0n1p2 on /run/timeshift/backup type ext4 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro)

Check mount command man pages for more details.

$ man mount

Conclusion

These are 8 different Linux commands to find the mounted filesystem types in Linux. If you know any other methods, feel free to let me know in the comment section below. I will check and update this guide accordingly.

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